Academic Courses and Student Projects

AMST 202: 1960s

Dr. Jess Rigelhaupt

In this section of the sophomore American Studies seminar, students will discuss the Freedom Rides as they study the events of the 1960s.

HISP 463: Museum Interpretation and Exhibit Design Lab

Dr. Elisabeth Sommer

In this class, students will learn the ins and outs of museum interpretation, and play an active role in designing and implementing an exhibit. The class will read about and discuss issues of interpretation and the public interaction with museum exhibits. Students will produce an exhibit on the Freedom Rides that will be placed in the lobby of Dodd Auditorium for the March 30, 2011, local premiere of the new PBS movie Freedom Riders: Threatened, Attacked, Jailed, as well as additional components for graduation weekend.

FSEM 100: James Farmer Civil Rights

Dr. Colin Rafferty

In this section of the First-Year Seminar, students will explore the legacy of James Farmer and his role in the civil rights movement. The class will study Farmer’s work with CORE, the Freedom Rides, and other leaders of the movement.

COMM 370C: Freedom Riders

Dr. Tim O’Donnell

Taught in conjunction with the University of Mary Washington’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Rides in spring 2011, this course is designed to introduce students to the major figures and rhetorical significance of this crucial moment in the American civil rights movement. The course will work in concert with Dr. Anand Rao’s COMM 370D – Documenting Social Movements. Students will be familiar with the major figures involved in the historic journey to test desegregation on the interstate highway system, understand the communicative significance of the Rides in historical perspective, and participate in translating the lessons of the Freedom Riders to contemporary circumstances through individual advocacy.

COMM 370D: Documenting Social Movements

Dr. Anand Rao

Taught in conjunction with the University of Mary Washington’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Rides in spring 2011, this course is designed to introduce students to the major figures and rhetorical significance of this crucial moment in the American civil rights movement, with an emphasis on how this and other social movements are documented in text, film, and photographs. The course will work in concert with Dr. Tim O’Donnell’s COMM 370C – Freedom Riders. Students will work to develop a theoretical and practical understanding of various documentary tools, and will employ those tools to document the events occurring on campus this semester, as well as to document some of the work done by students and local groups as part of larger social movements.